Cathy Brown's blog

How Soon Can I Return to Work After Meniscus Surgery?

How Soon Can I Return to Work After Meniscus Surgery

The recovery time for meniscus surgery depends largely on what type of surgery you have. How soon you can get back to work will also depend on the type of work you do—you might miss a week of work or as much as three to six months.

Tears in the meniscus—the cartilage between the thigh and shin bones—are common. Sometimes doctors will recommend meniscus repair surgery, in which the torn edges are sutured back together. This is more commonly used in people under age 30.

How Physical Therapists Can Help You Get Back in the Game

How Physical Therapists Can Help You Get Back in the Game

When patients come to Arizona Bone and Joint, their treatment plan often includes physical therapy. That’s because we know how important physical therapy can be in helping patients recover and we’ve seen how well it works for so people.

We offer physical therapy on-site at both our Phoenix and Scottsdale offices. Our physical therapists are experienced at developing customized treatment plans for patients who need help with a variety of issues, including:

Should I Be Worried That My Joints Crack and Pop?

Should I Be Worried That My Joints Crack and Pop?

We’ve all cracked our knuckles or heard a popping sound from come our knees or shoulders from time to time. What does that mean? Are we headed for a life of pain and disability?

Orthopedic medicine specialists—the doctors that deal with the musculoskeletal system—get this question a lot. The short answer is that popping sound is nothing to worry about. But if you have pain along with it, you should see a doctor.

Does heat and humidity make joint pain worse?

Does heat and humidity make joint pain worse?

As we head into the Arizona monsoon season, you may be finding you have more trouble with joint pain.

Many people with arthritis find they have more stiffness and pain as the humidity rises and barometric pressure drops—as can happen before a monsoon storm. This may be because changes in temperature and humidity change the level of fluid in our joints.

In addition, the extreme Arizona heat alone can aggravate pain, simply by placing more stress on the body and making us more irritable and sensitive to discomfort.

Why You to Need to Know Whether You Have Rheumatoid Arthritis or Osteoarthritis

Why You to Need to Know Whether You Have Rheumatoid Arthritis or Osteoarthritis

Arthritis is arthritis, right? Not exactly. There are many different kinds of arthritis. Two of the most common are osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis.

Their primary symptoms are similar, mostly joint pain and stiffness. But they have different causes and sometimes may require different treatments.

Osteoarthritis, the more common condition, is known as a wear-and-tear disease. Over a lifetime of activity (or sometimes due to injury), the cartilage that cushions your joints begins to wear down. Without that cushion, you have pain.

Swimming with Shoulder Pain

Swimming with Shoulder Pain

Swimming is supposed to be a great low-impact activity for people with joint pain. But what if that joint is your shoulder? Can you still swim?

That depends. The first thing you need to do is stop swimming and see your doctor. Too often people try to “play through” the pain, which only makes the injury worse. Don’t make that mistake.